A Grand Gothic Cathedral in the Central square of Vienna
Most of all while traveling in Vienna, I liked the Cathedral of St. Stephen. The building is very impressive — it is large and beautiful. We stumbled on it by…

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Mysterious facts
10th place: The most interesting map of the Turkish Admiral Piri Reis is the coastline of Antarctica. The map was compiled in the sixteenth century based on the Greek maps…

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roman

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Understanding the greatest buildings of the world

 

 

Your world is filled with structures that have stood the test of time. That give character to the cities and landscapes in which they’re located. That are visited by millions of people each year. And that capture our wonder for the marvels of engineering innovation and progress.

But while structures such as the Giza pyramids, Brunelleschi’s dome, and the Brooklyn Bridge are visual spectacles in and of themselves, they are just as important for the way they were designed as for the way they look. These and other structural masterpieces were, first and foremost, novel creations born from the most progressive engineering concepts and tools of their day. They represent uniquely effective solutions to perplexing structural concerns. And they serve as landmark moments in the millennia-long history
of engineering.

Now, experience the engineering genius that makes these works possible with Understanding the World’s Greatest Structures: Science and Innovation from Antiquity to Modernity—a marvelous learning experience that takes you around the world and reveals the stories behind the most famous bridges, churches, skyscrapers, towers, and other structures from thousands of years of history. Delivered by award-winning Professor Stephen Continue reading

In the Syrian desert discovered mysterious structures

Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum (Canada) discovered in Syria, a mysterious stone circles and other features of the landscape that look as if they created people.

“They don’t have impressive size, as some of the megaliths, but they are clearly deliberately aligned, and therefore very interesting,” — said the archaeologist who first stumbled on them in 2009 near the monastery of Deir Mar Musa (Saint. Moses the Abyssinian), which is approximately 80 km North of Damascus.

A pile of stones (stage construction) and stone circle (here and below the photo of Robert Mason).

Alas, the tense situation in Syria have hindered excavation. A preliminary analysis of fragments of stone tools, are scattered in this area, put this date in their Neolithic and early bronze age of 6-10 thousand years ago.

According to Mr. Mason, the stones are positioned to stand out amid the empty landscape. Nearby there is nothing that would indicate a settlement. This is unusual, because the Neolithic people, as a rule, buried the dead and Continue reading

In the Syrian desert discovered mysterious structures

Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum (Canada) discovered in Syria, a mysterious stone circles and other features of the landscape that look as if they created people.

“They don’t have impressive size, as some of the megaliths, but they are clearly deliberately aligned, and therefore very interesting,” — said the archaeologist who first stumbled on them in 2009 near the monastery of Deir Mar Musa (Saint. Moses the Abyssinian) about 80 km North of Damascus.

Alas, the tense situation in Syria have hindered excavation. A preliminary analysis of fragments of stone tools, are scattered in this area, put this date in their Neolithic and early bronze age is 10-6 thousand years ago.

According to Mr. Mason, the stones are positioned to stand out amid the empty landscape. Nearby there is nothing that would indicate a settlement. This is unusual, because the Neolithic people, as a rule, buried the dead and performed rites right there where they lived. Perhaps, the archaeologist came across one of the earliest examples of the development of ideas about “the land of the dead” than “the land of the living”, which is characteristic of the later European Neolithic. On the other hand, monopreparatam that settlements in these areas were seasonal, so the traces of inhabitance are not obvious. Continue reading

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